wholeliving

Double Dark-Chocolate and Ginger Biscotti

The sweet spiciness of the crystallized ginger in these cookies complements the richness of the dark chocolate. Cooking tip: Avoid getting water in the chocolate mixture while it's melting, or the chocolate will seize up and become granular and clumpy, ultimately making it difficult to work with.

Body+Soul, January/February 2007
  • Prep Time 25 Minutes
  • Total Time 1 hour 25 minutes, plus cooling time
  • Yield Makes 2 1/2 dozen
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg, plus 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • 3 ounces dark chocolate, coarsely chopped (1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt until well combined; set aside. In the large bowl of an electric mixer, beat egg, egg yolk, and sugar until light and fluffy; beat in the vanilla and oil until well combined.

  3. With the mixer on low, beat in dry ingredients until combined. Fold in walnuts, chocolate, and ginger with a rubber spatula (dough will be stiff).

  4. With moistened hands shape the dough into 2 logs, each about 9 inches long and 2 1/2 inches wide. Bake until set on top, about 20 minutes. Cool 10 minutes in pan. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees.

  5. Transfer logs to a cutting board and, with a serrated knife, cut each log on the diagonal into 16 slices, each 1/2 inch thick. Bake until crisp, about 20 minutes, turning the biscotti over midway through. Cool 5 minutes on a baking sheet, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container for up to a week.

Recipe Reviews

Reviews (24)

  • 29 Jul, 2013

    I just made these and my family loved them. They came out very chocolaty. Very easy to make.

  • 18 Sep, 2011

    These turned out quite well. As mentioned in a previous post, you do not melt the chocolate, but finely chop it and work it in with the nuts. I substituted half walnuts, half slivered almonds and to cut back on sugar, used a small amount of ground ginger and Ghirardelli chocolate. For presentation, I then glazed them with melted white chocolate and sprinkled them with fresh ground nutmeg.

  • 5 Sep, 2011

    This is a fast and easy recipe. Turned out chocolatey and yummy. I decided to "healthy" it up more and substituted the white flour with 3//4 spelt and 1/4 soy flours. I used only half of the canola oil and the rest was ground flaxseed meal. I will definitely make this again and add a little more ginger. And, you don't melt the chocolate. You are mixing in the cocoa powder and either chocolate chips and broken chocolate pieces. I recommend doubling or tripling the recipe...they go fast.

  • 22 May, 2011

    This is the best biscotti recipe I've ever made. My family loves it. Usually the recipes I've made did not use any oil or butter, but turned out rock hard and needs to be dunked in coffee/tea. This recipe only uses little oil, and came out crispy, like ones I would buy in a bakery. Highly recommended!

  • 19 Oct, 2010

    If you are finding the biscotti a little delicate to work with, I would recommend cooling them completely after the first baking before cutting. I usually let mine sit for at least and hour or so before I try to get a knife into the logs. This helps to create the uniform, attractive biscotti shape before baking the second time.

  • 19 Oct, 2010

    If you are finding the biscotti a little delicate to work with, I would recommend cooling them completely after the first baking before cutting. I usually let mine sit for at least and hour or so before I try to get a knife into the logs. This helps to create the uniform, attractive biscotti shape before baking the second time.

  • 8 Oct, 2010

    You are NOT supposed to melt the dark chocolate. If you read the recipe carefully, it says to fold the coarsely-chopped dark chocolate into the dough along with the walnuts and chopped crystallized ginger, Clearly, the dark chocolate is intended to BE dark-chocolate "chips"!

  • 17 Sep, 2010

    Where were we supposed to melt the chocolate? i read and re-read the instructions, so I just put mine in as chucks. Allergic to walnuts so just left them out. Mine did not come out as tall, but longer and skinnier. great recipe!

  • 23 Feb, 2010

    These are so good! I make these every Christmas to go in my hand-made gift tins and everyone loves them. The crystalized ginger is a delicious dimension. They are delicate to work with, though... a good percentage of mine usually break before they get into the gift tins.... oh well, it doesn't change how they taste! Don't melt the chopped chocolate, mix it in as chunks. Don't be intimidated by the sticky dough, wet fingers will do the trick.

  • 13 Dec, 2009

    I have made this recipe many times with success, and I have never melted the chocolate bits. I use dark chocolate chips, and just mix them in with the nuts and ginger. I don't have any trouble with the cookies holding together. This is one of my favorite biscotti recipes.

  • 2 Apr, 2009

    it looks like they missed a step, when I melted the chocolate in the microwave (30 seconds, and then stir, after that 10 second bursts stirring in between to get it completely melted, or use a double boiler) and folded it in just as the recipe says I came out with just wonderful biscotti. They held together wonderfully and very fantastic in both cocoa and coffee. The recipe says they will last a week in an airtight container but I have had them last much longer when stored in the fridge.

  • 26 Dec, 2008

    I made these cookies and they did not turn out well. I thought the batter looked rather stiff while mixing them but went ahead and baked them. Then, while they were in the oven, I reread the recipe it said something about melting the chocolate! They were extremely crumbly and did not hold together in slices for the second bake. I will not make them again!

  • 15 Dec, 2008

    Did anyone melt the chocolate as stated in the description but not in the instructions?

  • 3 Dec, 2008

    How long do you think this will keep fresh and yummy, if kept in an airtight container? Would you refrigerate or freeze them, in order to keep longer?
    I am thinkng holiday gifts.
    Thank you

  • 30 Oct, 2008

    I made this biscotti for company and I found it to be easy, more steps than I'm used to, but easy nontheless. I did not put the ginger in it because I didn't have it
    and I substituted the coarsely chopped dark chocolate for dark chocolate chips. I got rave reviews for this and many requests for the recipe.

  • 20 Oct, 2008

    I'm always looking for ideas on how to make a beloved recipe more healthy. Just wanted to share something that I have discovered. If you want to substitute white flour in a recipe, try using whole wheat pastry flour. I works really well....cup for cup. You can usually find it at your local health food store. Try it...you'll LOVE it!!

  • 20 Oct, 2008

    The nutrition information says 'per serving' but doesn't say what the serving size is - one piece? two? Anyone have any ideas?

  • 12 Aug, 2008

    Wooty, you say "yuck when you think WW, but it could be 'cause most WW flour is rancid by the time it gets to you. I used to hear that and not believe it, but once I got a mill and started milling my own wheat..OMG, what a huge diff You would never believe my sweet soft WW bread is made with 100% WW. I wish I'd discovered this years ago. Take a look at the Nutrimill (found all over the web). No affiliation, just a VERY satisfied customer (ask my neighbors and friends.they love my bread!

  • 12 Aug, 2008

    Good idea about the agave. Im gonna try it with rhapadura too. Im wondering how to get around the white flour though...... hmm. Im also replacing the canola oil with coconut oil. Im stuck aboutthe flour issue tho, im having a real issue with it, as i loooove white flour products and cant seem to replace it with whole wheat.... yuk

  • 28 Jul, 2008

    Crystallized ginger is available ready to use found in most grocery / natural food stores like Whole Foods in the bulk aisle or already packaged. I know you can replace with Agave Nectar. For each cup of white sugar replaced, use 2/3 of a cup of agave and reduce other liquids by 1/4 to 1/3 cup. Agave syrup may cause baked items to brown more quickly, so reduce oven temperatures by 25n n n n F is and increase baking time slightly.

  • 10 Jul, 2008

    How do you the crystallized ginger?

  • 30 Apr, 2008

    Has anyone tried this with Stevia yet?

  • 7 Feb, 2008

    How would this be possible since there is no chocolate mixture? <<Cooking tip: Avoid getting water in the chocolate mixture while it's melting, or the chocolate will seize up and become granular and clumpy, ultimately making it difficult to work with. >>

  • 3 Feb, 2008

    Add dates or prunes?