wholeliving

Double-Chocolate Brownies

Prune puree, available in the condiment section of the supermarket, replaces some of the fat in these fudgy brownies.
Per serving: 201 calories; 3 g protein; 6 g fat; 32 g carb.
Body+Soul, November/December 2005
  • Yield Makes 12 brownies
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Ingredients

  • 4 ounces semisweet chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup turbinado sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1/4 cup prune puree
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup oat flour
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line bottom and sides of an 8-inch square baking pan with foil, leaving a 2-inch overhang.

  2. Combine chocolate and oil in a medium heat-proof bowl. Set bowl over a pan of simmering water; stir until chocolate has melted. Remove from heat; whisk in sugar, egg, egg white, prune puree, vanilla, and salt until smooth.

  3. In a medium bowl, combine flour and cocoa. Stir into chocolate mixture just until incorporated.

  4. Spread batter in prepared pan. Bake until top is firm and a toothpick inserted in center comes out with a few moist crumbs, 40 to 45 minutes. Cool completely in pan. Using foil, lift brownies from pan. Peel off foil. Using a serrated knife, cut into 12 rectangles.

Recipe Reviews

Reviews (24)

  • 30 Aug, 2010

    Turbinado sugar is the same as Sugar in the Raw or Raw Sugar. It's brown and large in size. Almost any grocery store should have the Sugar in the Raw...

  • 9 Mar, 2010

    There's no turbinado sugar in my county. Could I replace with brown sugar

  • 12 Dec, 2008

    I made this brownies to my husband, with sweetner, because he can not eat sugar and it was very good. He asked for more already.

  • 20 Oct, 2008

    Using regular granulated sugar will up the amount of sugar overall; it's a finer grain than the larger, more crystalline Turbinado, so 1 cup will have more air in it than a cup of granulated. Some folkd also feel Turbinado is healthier as it's slightly less refined than granulated.

  • 16 Sep, 2008

    It's also a very quick recipe.

  • 16 Sep, 2008

    It's also a very quick recipe.

  • 16 Sep, 2008

    It's also a very quick recipe.

  • 10 Sep, 2008

    WL 90, to you mean "confessed that they loved it"? I had the same experience -- skeptics learned to love the prune puree inclusion.

  • 10 Sep, 2008

    WL 90, to you mean "confessed that they loved it"? I had the same experience -- skeptics learned to love the prune puree inclusion.

  • 10 Sep, 2008

    WL 90, to you mean "confessed that they loved it"? I had the same experience -- skeptics learned to love the prune puree inclusion.

  • 9 Sep, 2008

    I made these brownies for a work party. After a few chuckles about about the "prune puree" ingredient, my co-workers confused that they loved it!

  • 18 Aug, 2008

    I made this recipe using organic prune puree baby food. It came out wonderfully!
    But I also needed to add a 1/4 cup of milk to thin out the batter a bit.
    I LOVE THIS RECIPE.

  • 18 Aug, 2008

    I made this recipe using organic prune puree baby food. It came out wonderfully!
    But I also needed to add a 1/4 cup of milk to thin out the batter a bit.
    I LOVE THIS RECIPE.

  • 18 Aug, 2008

    I made this recipe using organic prune puree baby food. It came out wonderfully!
    But I also needed to add a 1/4 cup of milk to thin out the batter a bit.
    I LOVE THIS RECIPE.

  • 30 Apr, 2008

    I would recommend using yogurt, sour cream or applesauce in place of the prune puree. I have had these, and they taste distinctly prune-y.

  • 30 Apr, 2008

    I would recommend using yogurt, sour cream or applesauce in place of the prune puree. I have had these, and they taste distinctly prune-y.

  • 30 Apr, 2008

    I would recommend using yogurt, sour cream or applesauce in place of the prune puree. I have had these, and they taste distinctly prune-y.

  • 30 Apr, 2008

    I would recommend using yogurt, sour cream or applesauce in place of the prune puree. I have had these, and they taste distinctly prune-y.

  • 28 Apr, 2008

    What is "turbinado" sugar? Can regular white sugar be substituted? Thanks...

  • 28 Apr, 2008

    Try saying "prune puree" 5 times, quickly...a new tongue-twister!

  • 28 Apr, 2008

    Turbinado sugar is basically raw sugar. It has a less "refined" taste than regular granulated sugar (or so say some people- I just think it has a sweetness with more depth and less "pure sickly-sugar-sweet" flavor). You can buy it in bulk at grocery stores with bulk sections, or you could buy large quantities of "sugar in the raw".

  • 28 Apr, 2008

    what is turbinado sugar and has anyone tryed substituting a more common type of sugar?

  • 21 Mar, 2008

    You can always go to the baby food section and buy the prunes there. They are already pureed and ready for use. They are the perfect size for recipes such as this that only call for 1/4 cup. Also, are several brands to choose from, even organic! Hope this helps!

  • 17 Mar, 2008

    Would like to know the brand name of the prune puree, I've tried looking at every supermarket/specialty grocery store without any success. The question I'm asked every time is "What brand name is it sold under?" Without it they can't order it if they truly don't have it.